Mother Muse
Lorna Goodison

Lorna Goodison’s first poetry collection to be published in Canada in over nine years, Mother Muse heralds the return of a major voice. The poems in Goodison’s new book move boldly and range widely; here are praise songs alongside laments; autobiography shares pages with the collective past. In her exquisitely lyrical evocations of Jamaican lore and tradition, Goodison has always shown another side of history. While celebrating a wide cross-section of women—from Mahalia Jackson to Sandra Bland—Mother Muse focuses on two under-regarded “mothers” in Jamaican music: Sister Mary Ignatius, who nurtured many of Jamaica's most gifted musicians, and celebrated dancer Anita “Margarita” Mahfood. These important figures lead a collection of formidable scope and intelligence, one that seamlessly blends the personal and the political.

The Four-Doored House
Pierre Nepveu

The Four-Doored House evokes two key women in Pierre Nepveu’s life. First, his granddaughter Lily, who he imagines maturing into a complex world, haunted by her memory of him as he is haunted now by her projected self, navigating an era awash in uncertainty and unease. Imbued with both wonder and disquiet, it is an aging poet’s celebration of childhood, as well as a meditation on his own “future absence.” There follows his celebration of C, the woman with whom Nepveu shares his nights and days. These are love poems dedicated to a companion who has aided him in finding "new phrases that reformulate the impossible.” The culmination of a brilliant career, translated into fluent and thrilling English by Donald Winker, The Four-Doored House is Nepveu’s most enduring work yet.

Hotline
Dimitri Nasrallah

A vivid love letter to the 1980s and one woman’s struggle to overcome the challenges of immigration.

It’s 1986, and Muna Heddad is in a bind. She and her son have moved to Montreal, leaving behind a civil war filled with bad memories in Lebanon. She had plans to find work as a French teacher, but no one in Quebec trusts her to teach the language. She needs to start making money, and fast. The only work Muna can find is at a weight-loss center as a hotline operator.

All day, she takes calls from people responding to ads seen in magazines or on TV. On the phone, she’s Mona, and she’s quite good at listening. These strangers all have so much to say once someone shows interest in their lives–marriages gone bad, parents dying, isolation, personal inadequacies. Even as her daily life in Canada is filled with invisible barriers at every turn, at the office Muna is privy to her clients’ deepest secrets.

Following international acclaim for Niko (2011) and The Bleeds (2018), Dimitri Nasrallah has written a vivid elegy to the 1980s, the years he first moved to Canada, bringing the era’s systemic challenges into the current moment through this deeply endearing portrait of struggle, perseverance, and bonding.

Prophetess
Baharan Baniahmadi

An unflinching allegorical novel that explores trauma, women’s rights, and religious tradition.

In the slums of Tehran, seven-year-old Sara witnesses the horrific murder of her sister Setayesh, an event leaves her in shock and unable to speak. As the neighbourhood frantically searches for the missing girl, Sara is locked inside herself, unable to tell her parents or police all she knows.

Over time, the mute Sara develops a strange allergic reaction, in which hair covers her face every time a man approaches her. One day in school, when an imam gets too close, she faints. After Sara reawakens, classmates show her video of her speaking freely and eloquently while unconscious… in Polish. These are only the first of many unexpected developments in Sara’s life, as she grapples with how to live with her sister’s memory in a world that abuses women from a very early age.

Prophetess is a fearless novel of gripping and surreal turns that push the limits of the imagination in their collision of tradition and nonconformity. Baharan Baniahmadi has crafted a wild, allegorical interrogation of trauma, women’s rights, and religious tradition.

Durable Goods
James Pollock

Durable Goods is a book of sharply imagined poems about everyday technology. James Pollock calls to surprising life everything from microwaves to kettles, sprinklers to umbrellas, with a precision both unerring and effortless. By conjuring the essential spirit of each object, the poet reveals the tools and appliances that surround us as both sympathetic reflections of ourselves—our fear, love, rage, hope and grief—and strange beings with inner lives of their own. “It knows how much pressure you’ve been under,” Pollock writes, of the barometer, “that you could use a change of atmosphere.” Read together, these poems immerse us in an imagined world with the power to make us see our own in a new way. Suffused with dazzling wordplay, razor wit, and rippling sonic effects, the poems richly reward being read aloud. For Pollock, the most durable good is language itself.
Press

On Hotline:
“Nasrallah’s fourth novel, it takes his work to a new level of sophistication and constitutes a significant addition to the literary chronicling of the Canadian immigrant experience.” – Ian McGillis, Montreal Gazette

On Wolf Sonnets:
"R.P. LaRose's fierce and fiercely beautiful sonnets whirl like cyclones of dream and memory, converging on questions of Indigenous land stewardship, romantic heartbreak, family history, and Métis identity. LaRose's clear-eyed, anticolonial sequence not only challenges the 'flags and flagellations / of yet another not-empire / that calls itself a republic,' but also tenderly attends to moments of metaphysical and spiritual intensity." — Michael Prior "Wolf Sonnets

On Durable Goods:
"The poetic catalogue of ordinary things that James Pollock creates in Durable Goods

On Infinity Network:

"From selfhood to self-consumption, gunfire to the ‘black gasp suck(ing) back into the gun,’ the poems in Infinity Network

News

JANUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We are thrilled to share the news that Dimitri Nasrallah's Hotline is a 2023 Canada Reads selection! His inspiring novel of perseverance will be championed by bhangra dancer, artist and educator Gurdeep Pandher during the great Canadian book debate held from March 27-30 on CBC TV, CBC Radio and CBC Books. Congratulations to all the finalists! Baharan Baniahmadi's allegorial novel Prophetess is the Toronto International Festival of Author's virtual book club selection for the March 8, 2023 session. Plus poetry readings: Kaie Kellough and Tawhida Tanya Evanson in Montreal and John Barton on Salt Spring Island!

DECEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Our Holiday Gift Guide is here! A short but sweet selection of Véhicule's bestsellers, award-winners, the ever-popular Montreal photo collection History Through Our Eyes and, for the vintage pulp fan, the latest Ricochet bundle! And if you're already looking ahead to spring, check out our Spring 2023 catalogue!

NOVEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Congratulations! Iranian-Canadian author and actor Baharan Baniahmadi's Prophetess won the 2022 Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction at the Quebec Writers' Federation Literary Awards! Tawhida Tanya Evanson won the 2022 Blue Metropolis/ Conseil des arts de Montréal New Contribution Literary Prize for her novel Book of Wings! Véhicule will be at the Salon du livre de Montrél at booth #725 with the AELAQ and participating in several events and panels. And the Fall 2022 Montreal Review of Books is online chock-full of reviews and features!

OCTOBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Launch into fall with us! Letters from Montreal on Oct. 13 at Bar le Ritz, Durable Goods and Wolf Sonnets at The Word on Oct. 15, Black and Blue at Librairie Résonance on Oct. 28, and a special Toronto fall gala event at the Monarch Tavern on Oct. 19!SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Hotline is nominated for the Giller Prize! David Homel's novel A House Without Spirits launches Sept 29! And Letters From Montreal is now available!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).