Hotline
Dimitri Nasrallah

A vivid love letter to the 1980s and one woman’s struggle to overcome the challenges of immigration.

It’s 1986, and Muna Heddad is in a bind. She and her son have moved to Montreal, leaving behind a civil war filled with bad memories in Lebanon. She had plans to find work as a French teacher, but no one in Quebec trusts her to teach the language. She needs to start making money, and fast. The only work Muna can find is at a weight-loss center as a hotline operator.

All day, she takes calls from people responding to ads seen in magazines or on TV. On the phone, she’s Mona, and she’s quite good at listening. These strangers all have so much to say once someone shows interest in their lives–marriages gone bad, parents dying, isolation, personal inadequacies. Even as her daily life in Canada is filled with invisible barriers at every turn, at the office Muna is privy to her clients’ deepest secrets.

Following international acclaim for Niko (2011) and The Bleeds (2018), Dimitri Nasrallah has written a vivid elegy to the 1980s, the years he first moved to Canada, bringing the era’s systemic challenges into the current moment through this deeply endearing portrait of struggle, perseverance, and bonding.

The Family Way
Christopher DiRaddo

The year Paul turns forty, his friends Wendy and Eve ask him to help them get pregnant. Nothing about the process feels natural to him. But for a gay man of a certain age, making a family still means finding your own way through a world with few ready answers. The eighteen-month journey reveals many insights about Paul’s past and present, from his strained relationship to his father, his overprotective relationship with his partner Michael, and the many friends around him whom he considers his family.
Words are the Worst
Erik Lindner

Born in 1968 in The Hague, Erik Lindner is one of the Netherland’s most acclaimed poets. Admired for a style that fuses simplicity with strangeness, Lindner builds his poems through a montage of descriptive images that, by fending off closure, generate extraordinary visionary power. Gathering together new work with a selection from his previous six collections, Words are the Worst offers a range of pleasures that have made him celebrated in his home country: an austere eloquence; a hard, unsparing precision; a restless and idiosyncratic eye. Best of all is how his intensely filmic observations transform haunted landscapes of windmills, birds, dogs and houseboats on canals into, as one critic put it, “Lindner-like” moments. Brilliantly translated by Francis R. Jones, with an introduction by Canadian poet David O’Meara, Words are the Worst introduces a leading Dutch voice to English readers.
The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2020
Eli MacLaren et al.

Founded in 2010, the Montreal International Poetry Prize has established itself as a major event in contemporary poetry, both in Canada and around the world. The Montreal Prize Anthology 2020 explodes with talent, combining radiant vision with striking invention in form. The loss of a father finds equivalence in a tornado’s blowing an apartment open to the night sky. Sacred and profane images of a mother pile up in couplets, making a heap of gold. Family memory stirs in the dreamy measures of a sestina. Racial injustice is defied and reversed in the unflinching mirror of a palindromic poem. A doctor confesses her life work to be a striving to right the wrong done her father. These poems, a handful of the thousands submitted to the 2020 competition, were chosen for the lone virtue of their speaking directly to the reader, with conviction and with art.

In 2019, the founder of the Montreal Prize, Asa Boxer, transferred it to the Department of English at McGill University. A team of dedicated faculty and graduate students recruited a distinguished international jury, headed by Pulitzer-prize-winner Yusef Komunyakaa, to judge the entries. This book is the result.
After Realism
André Forget

After Realism: 24 Stories for the 21st Century is the first anthology to represent the generation of millennial writers now making their mark. Diverse, sophisticated, and ambitious in scope, the short stories in this ground-breaking book are an essential starting point for anyone interested in daring alternatives to the realist tradition that dominated 20th century English-language fiction. After Realism offers twenty-five distinctive talents who are pushing against the boundaries of the “real” in aesthetically and politically charged ways—forging their styles from influences that range from myth to autofiction, sci-fi to fairy tale, documentary to surrealism. Even those who continue to work in the realist tradition are doing so critically, with an eye to renovation. The selection is accompanied by comprehensive and provocative essay by editor André Forget that explains the themes, tendencies and concerns of this group. In bearing witness to an extraordinary flowering of contemporary fiction, After Realism will supply a new standard for Canadian writing.

With stories by Jean Marc Ah-Sen, Ryan Avanzado, Carleigh Baker, Tom Thor Buchanan, Paige Cooper, Marcus Creaghan, Paola Ferrante, Camilla Grudova, David Huebert, Jessica Johns, Cody Klippenstein, Michael LaPointe, Julie Mannell, Sofia Mostaghimi, Téa Mutonji, Fawn Parker, Casey Plett, Rudrapriya Rathore, Naben Ruthnum, Eliza Robertson, Cason Sharpe, John Elizabeth Stintzi, Gavin Thomson, and Christiane Vadnais.

Press

On The Geography of Pluto:
“(The) book is so sharply written and so full of insights into the human condition… DiRaddo has crafted a fine book about one young gay man’s struggle to realize his first big relationship really is over while holding his mother’s hand as she struggles through a cancer diagnosis and treatment. Set in Montreal’s gay milieu in the 1990s, The Geography of Pluto

On Book of Wings:
"Tawhida Tanya Evanson's first novel is a stunning testament to how the grief of heartbreak can bring us back to who we are." - Sheniz Janmohamed, Quill & Quire "Evanson is a seasoned poet, spoken word performer, and oral storyteller, and her craft is evident in this first work of prose fiction." - Helen Chau Bradley, Montreal Review of Books

On Words are the Worst:
"Lindner's poetry cuts into the quotidian mise en scène to lay bare illuminating juxtapositions across time and space. What is left on the screen of the page opens up another way of seeing, rife with amazement and curiosity." - Montreal Review of Books

On
Saving the City:
"One of the most fascinating Canadian political books in an age... Saving the City

News

DECEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Happy holidays! Two of our books are Quill & Quire Books of the Year: Book of Wings and My Mother, My Translator. Roundup of reviews, the Spring 2022 catalogue, and more!

World French-language rights sold for HOTLINE
>Hotline, Dimitri Nasrallah’s fourth novel, a vivid elegy to Montreal in the 1980s, is his most intimate offering to date. Véhicule Press has already sold world French rights to Nasrallah’s long-standing French-language publisher La Peuplade. Daniel Grenier’s translation will come out not only in Quebec, but also France, Belgium and Switzerland.

OCTOBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Fall books are here! Antonyms for Daughter by Jenny Boychuk, Open Your Heartby Alexie Morin, Fear the Mirrorby Cora Siré, and My Mother, My Translatorby Jaspreet Singh!

SEPTEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
We launch Hallelujah Time by poet Virginia Konchan. Fall fiction from Esplanade Books features Cora Siré's Fear the Mirror and Aimee Wall's translation of Alexie Morin's Open Your Heart.JUNE NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch Nectarine by Chad Campbell. Check out our Fall calendar and pre-order Jaspreet Singh's searing memoir My Mother, My Translator!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).