Spirits in the Dark
H. Nigel Thomas

First published in Canada in 1993, Spirits in the Dark is a pioneering intersectional novel of the LGBTQ+ and Caribbean-Canadian experience that was far ahead of its time.

In his powerful debut novel, H. Nigel Thomas writes with compelling honesty about the confusing maze of societal pressures that paralyze Jerome Quashee while growing up in the Caribbean, and later on in his adult life. Jerome’s intelligence at first promises him a gateway out of the poverty his parents have known, but he must compete with privileged White boys for scholarships in a racist, classist culture. Spirits in the Dark is the story of a man who represses his emerging homosexuality, fearing that it will bring his family disgrace, as he wrestles with the guilt of knowing so little about his African heritage and the pressure to let go his ties to Black culture. Under the spiritual guidance of Pointer Francis, he undergoes a religious ritual to block all sensory links to the outside world in order to see clearly into his past and face his demons.

The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2022
Eli MacLaren

Entries juried by Cameron Awkward-Rich, Martin Breul, Heather Christle, Nabina Das, Liz Howard, Joanne Limburg, Conor O’Callaghan, Tanure Ojaide, Michael Prior, Medrie Purdham, Mark Tredinnick, and Rhian Williams

Finalists judged by Lorna Goodison

Founded in 2010, the Montreal International Poetry Prize has established itself as a major event in contemporary poetry, both in Canada and around the world. The 2022 anthology continues the work of its predecessors, building the community of contemporary poetry on the twin principles of aesthetics and accessibility. Under this banner – poetry is for everyone – these poems speak of historic desolation and everyday bravery. Their images grip and hold. Here common experience crystallizes into stanzaic form, lending dignity to life in a ravaged world; here poetry melts into a rising, increasingly acidic ocean of prose that weeps for a prior earth.

From thousands of entries, these sixty poems were chosen for the virtue of their speaking to the reader, artfully and clearly. Lorna Goodison, winner of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, then judged the finalists, selecting the one poem – included here – to take the $20,000 prize. From Canada, Australia, the Caribbean, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Romania, Tunisia, the United Kingdom, the United States, and elsewhere, these lyrics voice a reality that you will recognize as strangely yours.

Girls, Interrupted
Lisa Whittington-Hill

The past decade has seen a rise in documentaries, memoirs and podcasts that revisit the legacies of women wronged by pop culture. With movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp challenging long-standing narratives around female celebrities, it’s no surprise so many believe the representation of women in the media has improved. In her scathingly witty collection of essays, Girls, Interrupted: How Pop Culture is Failing Women, Lisa Whittington-Hill argues otherwise. Pop culture’s treatment of women, writes Whittington-Hill, is still marked by misogyny and misunderstanding. From the gender bias in celebrity memoir coverage to problematic portrayals of middle-aged women and the sexist pressure on female pop stars to constantly reinvent themselves, Girls, Interrupted critically examines how mainstream media keeps failing women and explores what we can do to fix it. A work of searing relevance, this candid and often cathartic debut marks Whittington-Hill as a cultural critic of the first rank.

The Human Scale
Michael Lista

Whether investigating a gruesome triple-murder, a fairy tale marriage gone horribly wrong, or a brilliant con artist, Michael Lista has proven himself one of the most gifted storytellers of his generation. In his belief that crime reporting thrives the closer it moves to the human scale—where every uncovered secret reveals the truth of our obligations to each other—Lista builds his compulsively readable narratives from details (fake flowers, a little girl's necklace) others might pass over, details that provide a doorway into the extreme situations he is drawn to. The Human Scale not only includes Lista's most celebrated magazine stories to date, but comes with postscripts that describe his process in writing each piece, and the fallout from publication. Here is long-form journalism in its most hallowed form: brilliant and bingeable.
One Long Line of Marvel
Alan Hustak

There are parades and then there is Montreal’s St. Patrick’s parade, which has marched through the streets of the city and into Canadian history for 200 years. The street carnival has outlived the Patriote Rebellion of 1837, Fenian infiltration, Orange animosity, strained relationships among Roman Catholic priests who wanted it cancelled, two world wars, two Quebec independence referendums, and two centuries of howling March winds and chilling sub zero temperatures.

With One Long Line of Marvel veteran journalist Alan Hustak has dug up untold nuggets about the parade and nested them with historical certainty and an imaginative flourish in the setting of a Montreal that he knows. Although the author is not a son of Erin, he is considered an honorary Irishman and in 2006 walked the parade route as Chief Reviewing Officer. With this book he continues to honour Montreal’s Irish community by celebrating its personalities and by telling its stories. One Long Line of Marvel enlightens, entertains, amuses and perhaps above all superbly chronicles a long and worthwhile tradition in Montreal’s history.

Press

On The War You Don't Hate:


On Cathedral/Grove:
Praise for Susan Glickman: “These lyric poems have an unassuming grace and clarity.”—Barbara Carey, Toronto Star

On National Animal:
National Animal

On Quicker Than The Eye:
Praise for Joe Fiorito: "[Fiorito] is a master of sparsity—there are no wasted words here, no lingering sing-song rhymes or repetitive pentameter. Each word is carefully chosen, shaping each line with sometimes delicacy, sometimes bluntness. His pen is a scalpel. With a cool surgical incision he dissects memories."—Michael Sobota, Thunder Bay Chronicle Journal

News

MAY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Join us in Toronto for a double poetry launch - Flying Books welcomes Derek Webster and Rhea Tregebov May 22 at 6:30 for the launch of their new books National Animal and Talking to Strangers. Then on June 2 at 7 pm, we are at Supermarket in Toronto to launch Jean Marc Ah-Sen's highly anticipated novel Kilworthy Tanner. Then it's a Montreal launch at La Petite Librairie D+Q on June 14 at 7 pm for both Kilworthy Tanner and Blaise Ndala's The War You Don't Hate.

APRIL NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Congratulations to Signal Editions poets Rhea Tregebov and Derek Webster, who launched their new books Talking to Strangers and National Animal this month! We are also celebrating the publication of Blaise Ndala's novel The War You Don't Hate, translated by Dimitri Nasrallah. It will be launched on May 5th at the Ottawa International Writers' Festival. And speaking of Dimitri Nasrallah, Hotline is this year's selection for the One eRead Canada digital book club!

DECEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
'Tis the season to give the gift of books and we have just the thing for every book lover. From pulp fiction to pop culture, true love to true crime. As we approach the end of our 50th year, thank you to everyone who supported our mission of publishing quality Canadian writing. We can’t wait to share our new 2024 titles!

FÉLICITATIONS HOTLINE!
The French translation of Dimitri Nasrallah's Hotline (translated by Daniel Grenier, published by La Peuplade) has made the longlist for the Prix des libraires du Québec! Félicitations Daniel et Dimitri!NOVEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Join us on Sat. Nov. 25 at Paragraphe to launch our fall Signal Editions poetry titles Cathedral/Grove, Quicker Than The Eye, and States of Emergency. Looking for a pulp fiction holiday gift? Buy the latest six Ricochet Noir books in a special bundle for only $75! And our books will be at the Salon du livre de Montréal courtesy Saga Bookstore from Nov. 22-26.
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).