Mother Muse
Lorna Goodison

Lorna Goodison’s first poetry collection to be published in Canada in over nine years, Mother Muse heralds the return of a major voice. The poems in Goodison’s new book move boldly and range widely; here are praise songs alongside laments; autobiography shares pages with the collective past. In her exquisitely lyrical evocations of Jamaican lore and tradition, Goodison has always shown another side of history. While celebrating a wide cross-section of women—from Mahalia Jackson to Sandra Bland—Mother Muse focuses on two under-regarded “mothers” in Jamaican music: Sister Mary Ignatius, who nurtured many of Jamaica's most gifted musicians, and celebrated dancer Anita “Margarita” Mahfood. These important figures lead a collection of formidable scope and intelligence, one that seamlessly blends the personal and the political.

Durable Goods
James Pollock

Durable Goods is a book of sharply imagined poems about everyday technology. James Pollock calls to surprising life everything from microwaves to kettles, sprinklers to umbrellas, with a precision both unerring and effortless. By conjuring the essential spirit of each object, the poet reveals the tools and appliances that surround us as both sympathetic reflections of ourselves—our fear, love, rage, hope and grief—and strange beings with inner lives of their own. “It knows how much pressure you’ve been under,” Pollock writes, of the barometer, “that you could use a change of atmosphere.” Read together, these poems immerse us in an imagined world with the power to make us see our own in a new way. Suffused with dazzling wordplay, razor wit, and rippling sonic effects, the poems richly reward being read aloud. For Pollock, the most durable good is language itself.
Hallelujah Time
Virginia Konchan

Hallelujah Time, Virgina Konchan’s third full-length poetry collection—and the first to appear in Canada—delivers up poetry that is unlike anything being written today. Specializing in fast-moving monologues that track the vagaries and divagations of a mind in action, Konchan cuts our most hallowed cultural institutions and constructions down to size. She bracingly confronts the contemporary need to constantly adjust our masks to appease impossible standards, and our desperate fear of having our true selves be seen and understood. Hallelujah Time embraces a dazzling mix of idioms, registers, and tones in poems that compress everything they know into aphoristic, hard-boiled insights as arresting as they are witty, theatrical as they are sincere. “My human desire,” Konchan writes, “is simple: / to live on the perpetual cusp / of extremity.”
Antonyms for Daughter
Jenny Boychuk

Antonyms for Daughter, Jenny Boychuk’s poetry debut, addresses a harrowing subject: the loss of the poet’s mother to addiction. Deploying a range of forms and techniques astonishing in a first collection, Boychuk creates unsparing scenes of their complicated life together. Poem after poem attempts to wring clarity from memories ripe with trauma and love, as Boychuk questions whether it is possible for a child to ever extricate herself from an abusive parent—to become, as it were, a living “antonym” of a painful family legacy. A booklength loss-lyric of vivid beauty, Antonyms for Daughter is a singular example of grief transformed into art.
The Strangest Dream
Merrily Weisbord

Lauded as the most eloquent book about Canadian communists and written like drama, The Strangest Dream animates the history and life of militants from the 1930's to the 1956 Khruschev revelations about Stalin.

Published originally in 1983, this Third Edition contains a new preface by the author, additional photographs, and previously unpublished letters.

An antidote to recurrent anti-communist vitriol, The Strangest Dream evokes not only the struggle "to make a better world," but the warmth, generosity, songs, theatre, art, and exhilaration of party members for whom comradeship meant a way of life. Merrily Weisbord's research and contacts unearth historical documents and rare testimonies, including that of Canada's only communist MP, and of the accused in the Cold War spy trials.

The Strangest Dream is witness to the heyday and legacy of Canadian communists’ courage and social conscience, and to the forces that destroyed their dreams.

Press

On Saving the City:
"One of the most fascinating Canadian political books in an age... Saving the City

On The Strangest Dream :


On Hallelujah Time:
“Urgent, whip-smart—each poem opens like shaken champagne.” —John Emil Vincent

“Konchan’s audacious, sophisticated, and valiant poems, fueled by their honest failure to outwit mourning, are a revelation.” —Catherine Wagner “Her work is flamboyant, but underlying the glitz is a serious engagement with how we create meaning out of a welter of experiences and influences.” —Barb Carey, Toronto Star

On Hotline:
“Nasrallah’s fourth novel, it takes his work to a new level of sophistication and constitutes a significant addition to the literary chronicling of the Canadian immigrant experience.” – Ian McGillis, Montreal Gazette

News

APRIL NEWSLETTER (click for link)
On April 19 Jim Johnstone launches Infinity Network! Then in May, After Realism launches in Toronto and Montreal. Plus award nominations, reviews, events, and more!

FEBRUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Dimitri Nasrallah launches his much-anticipated new novel Hotline on Feb. 24 at Bar Le Ritz! Plus Tawhida Tanya Evanson makes CBC's list of 7 Black Canadian writers to watch in 2022! Reviews, events, and more!

JANUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Happy New Year! This month is the launch of Words are the Worst, plus Book of Wings and Dominoes at the Crossroads are longlisted for Canada Reads!

CANADA READS LONGLIST!
Tawhida Tanya Evanson’s novel, Book of Wings, and Kaie Kellough’s story collection, Dominoes at the Crossroads, are longlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads 2022. Congratulations, Tawhida and Kaie!DECEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Happy holidays! Two of our books are Quill & Quire Books of the Year: Book of Wings and My Mother, My Translator. Roundup of reviews, the Spring 2022 catalogue, and more!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).