Saving the City
Daniel Sanger

The rise to power of one of Canada’s most progressive municipal movements in recent memory.

When it was dreamed up in the early 2000s by a transportation bureaucrat with a quixotic dream of bringing tramways back to the streets of Montreal, few expected Projet Montréal to go anywhere. But a decade and a half later, the party was a grassroots powerhouse with an ambitious agenda that had taken power at city hall—after dumping its founder, barely surviving a divisive leadership campaign and earning the ire of motorists across Quebec.

Projet Montréal aspired to transform Montreal into a green, human-scale city with few, if any equal in North America. Equal parts reportage, oral history and memoir, Saving the City chronicles what the party did right, where it failed, and where it’s headed. Written from the perspective of someone who worked for Projet Montréal’s administration for almost a decade, Daniel Sanger’s book draws on dozens of interviews with other actors in the party and on the municipal scene, past and present.

A highly readable history of Montreal municipal politics over the past 30 years, Saving the City will also discuss issues of interest to city-dwellers across Canada. Are political parties at the municipal level a good thing? Is Montreal’s borough system a model for other big cities? What are the best ways to control urban car use? What is the optimum width for a sidewalk? The best kind of street tree? And why free parking is a terrible idea.

Open Your Heart
Alexie Morin

A much-celebrated auto-fictional feminist memoir, finally available in English.

In this frank and unforgettable book, celebrated Québécois writer Alexie Morin becomes the subject of her own story as she places a childhood friendship under a microscope. An autobiographical novel set in a small industrial town in Quebec during the 1990s, Open Your Heart recounts the story of a difficult friendship between two girls brought together by illness and operations suffered at a young age. One girl suffers from severe strabismus, while the other was born blue. The first, defiant, feels that something is wrong with her, while the second is an angelic child loved by all. One becomes a writer, and the other dies at eighteen, during an operation that should have saved her life.

In this debut novel, Morin stakes out an exceptional pursuit for truth in these old memories as she grapples with death, love, bonding and solitude.

Mother Muse
Lorna Goodison

Lorna Goodison’s first poetry collection to be published in Canada in over nine years, Mother Muse heralds the return of a major voice. The poems in Goodison’s new book move boldly and range widely; here are praise songs alongside laments; autobiography shares pages with the collective past. In her exquisitely lyrical evocations of Jamaican lore and tradition, Goodison has always shown another side of history. While celebrating a wide cross-section of women—from Mahalia Jackson to Sandra Bland—Mother Muse focuses on two under-regarded “mothers” in Jamaican music: Sister Mary Ignatius, who nurtured many of Jamaica's most gifted musicians, and celebrated dancer Anita “Margarita” Mahfood. These important figures lead a collection of formidable scope and intelligence, one that seamlessly blends the personal and the political.

Words are the Worst
Erik Lindner

Born in 1968 in The Hague, Erik Lindner is one of the Netherland’s most acclaimed poets. Admired for a style that fuses simplicity with strangeness, Lindner builds his poems through a montage of descriptive images that, by fending off closure, generate extraordinary visionary power. Gathering together new work with a selection from his previous six collections, Words are the Worst offers a range of pleasures that have made him celebrated in his home country: an austere eloquence; a hard, unsparing precision; a restless and idiosyncratic eye. Best of all is how his intensely filmic observations transform haunted landscapes of windmills, birds, dogs and houseboats on canals into, as one critic put it, “Lindner-like” moments. Brilliantly translated by Francis R. Jones, with an introduction by Canadian poet David O’Meara, Words are the Worst introduces a leading Dutch voice to English readers.
Durable Goods
James Pollock

Durable Goods is a book of sharply imagined poems about everyday technology. James Pollock calls to surprising life everything from microwaves to kettles, sprinklers to umbrellas, with a precision both unerring and effortless. By conjuring the essential spirit of each object, the poet reveals the tools and appliances that surround us as both sympathetic reflections of ourselves—our fear, love, rage, hope and grief—and strange beings with inner lives of their own. “It knows how much pressure you’ve been under,” Pollock writes, of the barometer, “that you could use a change of atmosphere.” Read together, these poems immerse us in an imagined world with the power to make us see our own in a new way. Suffused with dazzling wordplay, razor wit, and rippling sonic effects, the poems richly reward being read aloud. For Pollock, the most durable good is language itself.
Press

On After Realism:
“What the stories in AFTER REALISM display in aggregate is a willingness to stretch form and subject to their limits, adapting or rejecting traditional techniques and approaches at will. As a whole, the volume provides a provocative snapshot of the forces dragging CanLit — kicking and screaming — into the 21st century.” - Steven Beattie, Toronto Star

On
Antonyms for Daughter:
"Quietly, in contemplation or more harrowing emotional drives, Boychuk's poems unravel the weight of a complicated relationship spanning their entwined lifetimes to expose the tendrils netted between a child and parent and the impossible-seeming task of disentangling oneself in the face of trauma and grief." – Montreal Review of Books

On
Words are the Worst:
"Lindner's poetry cuts into the quotidian mise en scène to lay bare illuminating juxtapositions across time and space. What is left on the screen of the page opens up another way of seeing, rife with amazement and curiosity." - Montreal Review of Books

On
My Mother, My Translator:
"Jaspreet Singh shows how the memoirist can, in fact, graciously make meaning of a very human, very complicated person, while capturing the intensity of the love between a mother and her son. He shows how a memoir can make for a gem of a book." - John Lownsbrough, Literary Review of Canada

News

JUNE NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Writers Unbound returns to MATv! Lorna Goodison launches Mother Muse! Baharan Baniahmadi launches Prophetess! And The Walrus reviews Hotline!

MAY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Jaspreet Singh launches My Mother, My Translator at The Word! Baharan Baniahmadi launches Prophetessat Argo, hosted by Jacob Wren! Plus our Fall catalogue and more!

APRIL NEWSLETTER (click for link)
On April 19 Jim Johnstone launches Infinity Network! Then in May, After Realism launches in Toronto and Montreal. Plus award nominations, reviews, events, and more!

FEBRUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Dimitri Nasrallah launches his much-anticipated new novel Hotline on Feb. 24 at Bar Le Ritz! Plus Tawhida Tanya Evanson makes CBC's list of 7 Black Canadian writers to watch in 2022! Reviews, events, and more!JANUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Happy New Year! This month is the launch of Words are the Worst, plus Book of Wings and Dominoes at the Crossroads are longlisted for Canada Reads!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).