Black History Month Bundle


Join us in celebrating the legacy of great Black writing from Montreal with books by Tawhida Tanya Evanson and Kaie Kellough.
For $30, plus $6 shipping within Canada, you'll receive:

Book of Wings by Tawhida Tanya Evanson

"Tawhida Tanya Evanson's first novel is a stunning testament to how the grief of heartbreak can bring us back to who we are." - Sheniz Janmohamed, Quill & Quire

Dominoes at the Crossroads by Kaie Kellough

Winner, 2020 QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction; Finalist, Grand Prix du Livre de Montréal 2020; Longlisted for the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize.

"This is more than a book of linked short stories with Black Canadians as its subject. Dominoes at the Crossroads articulates how Black history is not marginal to Canada's story, but central to it – encoded in its history, and therefore its future too." - Jade Colbert, Globe and Mail
Kathy Dobson Bundle
Kathy Dobson

Our March bundle features Kathy Dobson's two searing memoirs With a Closed Fist: Growing up in Canada's Toughest Neighbourhood and Punching and Kicking: Leaving Canada's Toughest Neighbourhood for $30 plus $6 flat rate shipping in Canada. These books recount the challenges of growing up in, and eventually leaving, Point Saint Charles, once an industrial working-class neighbourhood, now in the throes of gentrification.

Praise for Kathy Dobson's books:

"Dobson has enormous talent, and we all must be thankful that she did beat the odds and find her way through the maze of deprivation and violence to speak her truths in such a creative and telling book." – Pat Capponi, Globe and Mail

"It reads like fiction... younger Kathy's voice is strikingly believable: candid, scornful, funny" – Anna Leventhal, Montreal Review of Books

"Kathy Dobson vividly gives us a surprisingly clear glimpse through a child's eyes of what it is like to live in poverty. Her language rings true as it portrays lives of people struggling every day and night with the physical, economic, emotional and political assaults of poverty and its constant humiliations. This is a rare insider expose." – Linda Savory Gordon, Assoc. Professor, Dept. of Community Development and Social Work, Algoma University

"This is as authentic a description, language and all, of life in the Point during the 60s and 70s as it is possible to get. Poverty, hunger, love, abuse, ingenuity, survival, intelligence, language wars— they are all there; fierce optimism and laugh-out-loud humour carry the story along. That is the way it was. I know , I was there." – Nicolas Steinmetz, MD

"In a place between the profound and the profane, lives a raw, unapologetic, and funny voice of Kathy Dobson. In an honest and harrowing account of poverty, she tells a powerful story of resilience of a girl turned woman." – Merlyna Lim, Canada Research Chair, Carleton University
Antonyms for Daughter
Jenny Boychuk

Antonyms for Daughter, Jenny Boychuk’s poetry debut, addresses a harrowing subject: the loss of the poet’s mother to addiction. Deploying a range of forms and techniques astonishing in a first collection, Boychuk creates unsparing scenes of their complicated life together. Poem after poem attempts to wring clarity from memories ripe with trauma and love, as Boychuk questions whether it is possible for a child to ever extricate herself from an abusive parent—to become, as it were, a living “antonym” of a painful family legacy. A booklength loss-lyric of vivid beauty, Antonyms for Daughter is a singular example of grief transformed into art.
After Realism
André Forget

After Realism: 24 Stories for the 21st Century is the first anthology to represent the generation of millennial writers now making their mark. Diverse, sophisticated, and ambitious in scope, the short stories in this ground-breaking book are an essential starting point for anyone interested in daring alternatives to the realist tradition that dominated 20th century English-language fiction. After Realism offers twenty-five distinctive talents who are pushing against the boundaries of the “real” in aesthetically and politically charged ways—forging their styles from influences that range from myth to autofiction, sci-fi to fairy tale, documentary to surrealism. Even those who continue to work in the realist tradition are doing so critically, with an eye to renovation. The selection is accompanied by comprehensive and provocative essay by editor André Forget that explains the themes, tendencies and concerns of this group. In bearing witness to an extraordinary flowering of contemporary fiction, After Realism will supply a new standard for Canadian writing.

With stories by Jean Marc Ah-Sen, Ryan Avanzado, Carleigh Baker, Tom Thor Buchanan, Paige Cooper, Marcus Creaghan, Paola Ferrante, Camilla Grudova, David Huebert, Jessica Johns, Cody Klippenstein, Michael LaPointe, Julie Mannell, Sofia Mostaghimi, Téa Mutonji, Fawn Parker, Casey Plett, Rudrapriya Rathore, Naben Ruthnum, Eliza Robertson, Cason Sharpe, John Elizabeth Stintzi, Gavin Thomson, and Christiane Vadnais.

Nectarine
Chad Campbell

Memory—how we retrieve and replenish it—is at the heart of Nectarine, Chad Campbell's visionary second collection. Figures, cities, and landscapes from the author's life shift in and out of these dreamlike poems that explore the “unaccountable, uncountable” ways in which our past keeps speaking to us: through objects, through paintings, through colours, and through the spectre of places that map themselves over the places we live in. Subtle, unsettling, compressed, and full of incandescently beautiful language, Nectarine is about lost things, stranded moments, and traces preserved in time like “a glass of frozen nectarine halves / on a table made of ice.”
Press

On Hallelujah Time:
“Urgent, whip-smart—each poem opens like shaken champagne.” —John Emil Vincent

“Konchan’s audacious, sophisticated, and valiant poems, fueled by their honest failure to outwit mourning, are a revelation.” —Catherine Wagner “Her work is flamboyant, but underlying the glitz is a serious engagement with how we create meaning out of a welter of experiences and influences.” —Barb Carey, Toronto Star

On My Mother, My Translator:
“A powerful and moving memoir, kinetic in its tracing of the various impacts of inherited trauma through several generations of Jaspreet Singh's family living through Partition and Sikh massacre in India to himself here in Canada. Through a series of digressions, both playful and deeply serious, My Mother, My Translator

On Fear the Mirror:
"The collection resonates with childhood recollections, poetry, historical references, and intriguing characters, not the least of whom are a strong-minded mother and an elusive grandmother. The memoirist narratives in this collection are rich in rhythms that reveal lives complicated by war, displacement, and immigration." – Montreal Review of Books

On
Little Housewolf:
"Built on the plain pleasure of examining small domestic items and happenings, Little Housewolf

News

JANUARY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Happy New Year! This month is the launch of Words are the Worst, plus Book of Wings and Dominoes at the Crossroads are longlisted for Canada Reads!

CANADA READS LONGLIST!
Tawhida Tanya Evanson’s novel, Book of Wings, and Kaie Kellough’s story collection, Dominoes at the Crossroads, are longlisted for CBC’s Canada Reads 2022. Congratulations, Tawhida and Kaie!

DECEMBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Happy holidays! Two of our books are Quill & Quire Books of the Year: Book of Wings and My Mother, My Translator. Roundup of reviews, the Spring 2022 catalogue, and more!

World French-language rights sold for HOTLINE
>Hotline, Dimitri Nasrallah’s fourth novel, a vivid elegy to Montreal in the 1980s, is his most intimate offering to date. Véhicule Press has already sold world French rights to Nasrallah’s long-standing French-language publisher La Peuplade. Daniel Grenier’s translation will come out not only in Quebec, but also France, Belgium and Switzerland. OCTOBER NEWSLETTER (click for link)
Fall books are here! Antonyms for Daughter by Jenny Boychuk, Open Your Heartby Alexie Morin, Fear the Mirrorby Cora Siré, and My Mother, My Translatorby Jaspreet Singh!
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).