Mayonnaise
Éric Plamondon

Writer Richard Brautigan was a counter-cultural icon of the 1960s. In Mayonnaise, the second novel of Éric Plamondon's 1984 Trilogy, narrator Gabriel Rivages pieces together Brautigan's life starting in Oregon, where he was born, to San Francisco, where he became a poet and satirical novelist, and on to Bolinas, California, where he committed suicide in 1984. Sifting through the ruins of Sixties idealism, Plamondon recasts the American western frontier into a surreal, timeless place of industrial invention, Hollywood glamour and acid-washed hedonism. Originally published in French, Mayonnaise was a finalist for the Grand Prix du livre de Montreal.
The Gang of Four
Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan

The nightmare began on a warm summer night. A six-year-old boy was found in a park shack, bludgeoned to death in the quiet residential district of Montreal's Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. Soon after, an eight-year-old boy disappeared. Horror and fear gripped the city. Neighbourhoods went silent. Suspects were questioned, suspicion and alarm mounts. No arrests were ever made.

When Lieutenant Detective Damiano discovers the cold case many years later and learns that the three suspects are still alive, she's hooked, on what cops call a Detective's Case. Her partner, Detective Pierre Matte, hesitantly agrees to work with her. They meet Kathryn Flynn, the ninety-year-old mother, who has kept meticulous files throughout the years--her hope has never faltered. Damiano and Matte rediscover what binds them, a reckoning for the murderers among us and justice for the victims who have no voice.
Afterwords
Geoffrey Cook

The belief in translation as an act of self-portraiture drives Afterwords, Geoffrey Cook's ambitious reimagining of German poems by Goethe, Heine, Rilke and Brecht. Cook's versions not only transform these foreign texts into English poems in their own right, but enrich and expand his uniquely prismatic voice. Cook brings a contemporary and Canadian tone to his adaptations, which also showcase the exacting craftsmanship for which his first collection, Postscript, was praised. Afterwords is a book that daringly celebrates authorship as a shared project. "Do you not feel," writes Goethe, "that, in my songs, I am one and the other, too?"
Resisting Canada
Nyla Matuk

Resisting Canada gathers together poets for a conversation bigger than poetic trends. The book's organizing principle is Canada--the Canada that established residential schools; the Canada grappling with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; the Canada that has been visible in its welcome of Syrian refugees, yet the not-always-tolerant place where the children of those refugees will grow up; the Canada eager to re-establish its global leadership on the environment while struggling to acknowledge Indigenous sovereignty on resource-rich land and enabling further colonization of that land. In the face of global conflicts due to climate change, scarcity, mass migrations, and the rise of xenophobic populisms, Canada still works with a surface understanding of its democratic values--both at their noblest and most deceptive.

The work included in Resisting Canada--by celebrated poets such as Lee Maracle, Jordan Abel, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Louise Bernice Halfe, Michael Prior, and Leanne Betasamosake Simpson--addresses, among other things, Indigenous agency, cultural belonging, environmental anxieties, and racial privilege. These poems ask us to judge and resist a statecraft that refuses to acknowledge past and present wrongs. Think of Resisting Canada as a poetic letter to Canada's politicians and leaders.
The Teardown
David Homel

David Homel’s eighth novel is an exquisitely written, brutally honest, brave work from a two-time Governor General Award winner at the peak of his powers.

Phil Brenner has fallen into a slump. All of his life’s achievements have somehow crept into disarray. As a freelance journalist, his career pinnacles keep receding in the rearview, as he struggles to stay relevant in a culture that prizes identity over experience. He feels unfairly cast aside by younger generations, designated the very “white male of privilege” he spent much of his youth rallying against. As a husband, he’s estranged from his wife, whose job supports the suburban lifestyle he never wanted. As a father, his two daughters repel any attempt he makes to connect.

But when a chance arises to cover the refugee crisis in Eastern Europe, Phil seizes the opportunity to reinvent himself into the person he could be, if only he can bring himself to tear down the tired notions of who he has become.
Press

On Mayonnaise:
"Not content to simply write about Brautigan, nor to write like Brautigan, Plamondon delivers a zinger concerning the strange connection between Brautigan and Rivages that will leave the reader wondering just where truth ends and fiction begins." - Vince Tinguely, Montreal Review of Books

On
Four Days:
"Buell... delights readers with vivid descriptions of English Montreal in the early 1960s—its Irish mobsters, aristocratic Westmount denizens, the city's affluence and its under-belly.... Véhicule Press has done a great service in republishing Four Days

On What We Carry:
These are beautifully written, intelligent, accessible poems. - Cary Fagan, Writers' Trust Newsletter

On
The Suicide's Son:
The poems in James Arthur’s new collection, The Suicide’s Son, convey a mastery of resonance and form...irony and playfulness. - Cora Sire, Montreal Review of Books

News

#NationalIndigenousPeoplesDay
Zebedee Nungak: “The need to correct the forced imposition of extinguishment and surrender of Aboriginal rights to establish agreements between governments and Indigenous peoples is still outstanding, unfinished business.” bit.ly/2ZxVFHm

BRAVO ROBIN
We're chuffed that Robin Richardson won the 2019 Trillium Book Award for her poetry collection Sit How You Want. Kudos also to her Signal Editions editor, Carmine Starnino.

FOUNDER OF POETRY SERIES HONOURED BY MCGILL
Michael Harris was given an Honorary Doctorate (D.Litt., honoris causa) by McGill University on June 3rd, in the main for his contribution to the world of poetry as founder/editor of the Signal Editions poetry imprint of Vehicule Press.

KUDOS TO OUR SIGNAL POETS
Laura Ritland’s debut collection, East and West, has been nominated for the 2019 Pat Lowther Memorial Prize and Robin Richardson’s Sit How You Want for the 2019 Trillium Book Award.THATS A LOT OF CANDLES!
2018 was our 45th anniversary. The publishing landscape has changed substantially since we began printing in the back of an artist-run gallery in downtown Montreal in 1973. Older, and perhaps wiser, we've changed too, but our commitment to Canadian writers and writing has remained constant. Here are some pictures from the anniversary celebration: Part One & Part Two
Discover

Mary Dalton, Poet Laureate of St. John's NL, reads poems from Red Ledger on the Flahoolic podcast: "Leo" & "Ship Inn" and "Cape Spear" & "The Boat".

Listen to Zebedee Nungak, Ulrikke S. Gernes, and Morten Stroksnes discuss the meaning of North on CBC Ideas.

Available together for the first time—all twelve books from the Ricochet Books series. Buy the Ricochet Bundle and collect all twelve riveting noir novels for 120$.

Listen to Elaine Kalman Naves in conversation with Nigel Beale. Robert Weaver, Godfather of Canadian Literature.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).