Health Care and Politics
David Levine

Drawing on his experience from forty years running many Canadian health care institutions, David Levine shares his expertise on management in this very complex environment. His career includes implementing one of the first Local Community Health Centres (CLSCs) in Montreal in the 1970s, involvement in electoral politics, managing various Québec hospitals, his controversial hiring as Head of the Ottawa Hospital, a term as Québec Delegate General in New York City, a stint as Junior Minister of Health in Québec, and running the Montreal regional health authority under both Parti-Québécois and Liberal governments.

His experience with politics—both personal and professional—is the basis of his analysis of the impact of politics on health care. Levine supports without qualification a Public, Universal Health Care System, but he questions the effectiveness of managing the system from the Minister’s Office. Poor decision-making on the basis of politics often means best solutions are not implemented.

Levine’s analysis includes what is not working and how to fix it, and the barriers to implementation.

Health Care and Politics will be of interest to health care managers, health care policy makers, and all Canadians seeking a better understanding of the health care system and what it will take to fix it.
Blondes Are My Trouble
Douglas Sanderson

"It's been a long time now, nearly two years since we met at that party."
"Yeah," Tessie said bitterly, "and nearly five years since I was a clever little girl who thought she'd found a way to make a hundred dollars. There was only going to be one time. I needed the dough. Two months later I didn't have an excuse any more and I was still doing it. Still am."


A blindingly blonde woman walks into private detective Mike Garfin’s downtown Montreal office, complaining that she’s being followed by a man. That evening, at a luxurious Lakeshore home, he witnesses another woman being forced into a car. Garfin gives chase, only to find her dead and disfigured beneath the wheels of a large truck on Highway 20. At first he sees no connection between the two – why should he? – but Garfin’s pursuit of the truth shows they are inextricably linked by base vice on the highest floors of the swankiest Sherbrooke Street apartments.

This Douglas Sanderson thriller follows Hot Freeze as the second Mike Garfin adventure. First published in 1954 under the title The Darker Traffic, a Dodd, Mead Red Detective Mystery, it was reissued the following year as Blondes are My Trouble by Popular Library. A French translation, Salmigonzeeses (1956), followed as part of Gallimard’s Série noir. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty years.


Advance Praise:

Mike Garfin is a boy who seems to like his work, especially if it includes blondes. –Berkeley Gazette

The story combines fancy floozies, sizzling smooching and gore … Fast paced action with a surprise climax. –Tulsa World
Hot Freeze
Douglas Sanderson

It was cold; bitterly paralysingly cold. There was a dampness in the air that bit into the marrow of your bones and stayed there. The red in the thermometer was below zero and still dropping steadily, and the weather forecasts offered no immediate hope of a let up. The city lay rigid under the stiffening blanket of snow. The air as you breathed it felt solid.

A raw novel of sex and drugs in the years just before rock’n’roll,Hot Freeze moves from the highest Westmount mansion to the lowest Montreal gambling joint and nightclubs. Its hero is Mike Garfin, a man who got kicked out of the rcmp for sleeping with the wife of a suspect. Recreating himself as an “inquiry agent”, Mike takes on what looks to be an easy job, shadowing a bisexual teenaged son of privilege who is throwing around more money than his allowance allows. But the boy disappears. Others soon follow, and Garfin’s world becomes a lonelier place.

First published in February 1954 as a Dodd, Mead Red Detective Mystery title,Hot Freeze enjoyed second and third lives as a Reinhardt hardcover and a Popular Library paperback. In 1955 a French translation, Mon cadavre au Canada, became part of Gallimard’s Serie noir. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty years.
All That Sang
Lydia Perovi?

Obsession, unrequited passions and the power of music.

A visceral tale of obsession and creativity, unrequited passions and the power of music. A love story in which art is a foil to companionship, and the intellect an interlocutor of the heart.
In the utterly unique All that Sang, the second fiction by Lambda Literary Award-finalist Lydia Perovi?, a Toronto opera critic on assignment in Paris falls in love with the subject she’s been sent to interview, France’s leading female conductor. But is the attention evenly matched, is genuine connection even possible?
Perovi? guides us through the panorama that orbits contemporary courtship. The jilted lover, the housekeeper, the chiropractor, the manager, all take part in a chorus of voices that illustrate the unknowable creative spirit whose inaccessibility fires the writer’s obsession.
Reminiscent of the bold and inventive fictions of Ali Smith and Siri Hustvedt, postmodern refractions play with the reader’s sense of perspective to build the persona of affection, a figure of reality and imagination that we all recognize but can never truly access.

Praise:

“This kaleidoscopic love story – told from many angles in elegant, crystalline prose – creates a world that holds the reader skillfully in between. Between Toronto and Paris, music and listening, lust and loss. Unrequited and erotic, All That Sang is a story of longing beautifully sent to us in the manner that only true longing can convey.’ –Jacob Wren, author of Polyamorous Love Song
The Body on Mount Royal
David Montrose

Finally, after 58 years The Body on Mount Royal is back in print, starring hard-drinking private dick, Russell Teed.

From the back cover of the 1953 edition:
Take a brutally beaten body, a lonely spot on Montreal's famous mountain, and a buxum brunette whose embrace brings treachery. Add a large dose of vicious gang warfare and a slice of underworld life. Mix these ingredients well and you have a large helping of spicy, fast-paced adventure.

An excerpt from the book:
I have a hunch you want to hear about the people I know, the ones I work among and get drunk with, and beat up or get beat up by. Sure, I know the rolling greenery of upper Westmount and the high square solemn houses of midtown Montreal's Square Mile, and the wide streets of Outremont with the mansions set way back. But my name is Russell Teed. R. Teed, Private Investigator. I don't always like it, but I get involved in crimes. And I go where the criminals go.
Press

On Laws & Locks:
Muscled and big boned as Lowell’s poems on his ancestors, Chad Campbell’s lines hold enough feral energy to carve a small farm out of the great hardwood forest. This work is just and transcendent. A marvelous debut. – Tim Lilburn

On Installations:
Praise for : This is writing of a very high order. –Canadian Literature

On Blondes Are My Trouble:
Mike Garfin is a boy who seems to like his work, especially if it includes blondes. –Berkeley Gazette

On English Is Not a Magic Language:
This new novel by Poulin is an elegy to lasting love.–Robert Lévesque, La Presse

News

PAUL BLEY
1932-2016

We are saddened by the January 3 passing of renowned jazz pianist Paul Bley, at 83. Born in Montreal he played and recorded with Lester Young, Ben Webster, Sonny Rollins, Charles Mingus, Paul Motian, Pat Metheny and many others. We were proud to publish his memoir Stopping Time: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz and Paul Bley: The Logic of Chance by Arrigo Cappelletti.

Niko
Dimitri Nasrallah’s novel, Niko, makes the CBC Canada Reads Longlist.

Swing in the House
Anita Anand is nominated for the Blue Metropolis/Conseil des arts du Montréal Literary Diversity Prize for a First Publication.

Catalogue
Check out our Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 Catalogues.Swing in the House
Anita Anand’s Swing in the House and Other Stories wins the 2015 QWF Concordia University First Book Award.
Discover

Mary Dalton celebrates the language and culture of Newfoundland on The Next Chapter.

Shoshanna Wingate interviewed on Irish radio about Radio Weather.

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).