Swallowed
Réjean Ducharme

A New Translation of Réjean Ducharme’s Debut Novel That Rocked a Generation

In 1966, Réjean Ducharme, then a 24-year-old unknown, published L’Avalée des avalés, the debut novel that would go on to serve as a zeitgeist for several generations of French-Canadian readers.

Over the last fifty years, it has become a cornerstone for a culture, taught in high schools and universities as the foundation of modern Québécois literature. Astoundingly, an English-language edition of the book hasn’t been in print since 1968, and has never before been available in Canada.
The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2020
Eli MacLaren et al.

Founded in 2010, the Montreal International Poetry Prize has established itself as a major event in contemporary poetry, both in Canada and around the world. The Montreal Prize Anthology 2020 explodes with talent, combining radiant vision with striking invention in form. The loss of a father finds equivalence in a tornado’s blowing an apartment open to the night sky. Sacred and profane images of a mother pile up in couplets, making a heap of gold. Family memory stirs in the dreamy measures of a sestina. Racial injustice is defied and reversed in the unflinching mirror of a palindromic poem. A doctor confesses her life work to be a striving to right the wrong done her father. These poems, a handful of the thousands submitted to the 2020 competition, were chosen for the lone virtue of their speaking directly to the reader, with conviction and with art.

In 2019, the founder of the Montreal Prize, Asa Boxer, transferred it to the Department of English at McGill University. A team of dedicated faculty and graduate students recruited a distinguished international jury, headed by Pulitzer-prize-winner Yusef Komunyakaa, to judge the entries. This book is the result.
Antonyms for Daughter
Jenny Boychuk

Antonyms for Daughter, Jenny Boychuk’s poetry debut, addresses a harrowing subject: the loss of the poet’s mother to addiction. Deploying a range of forms and techniques astonishing in a first collection, Boychuk creates unsparing scenes of their complicated life together. Poem after poem attempts to wring clarity from memories ripe with trauma and love, as Boychuk questions whether it is possible for a child to ever extricate herself from an abusive parent—to become, as it were, a living “antonym” of a painful family legacy. A booklength loss-lyric of vivid beauty, Antonyms for Daughter is a singular example of grief transformed into art.
NPM Bundle #6


We're celebrating National Poetry Month with a new bundle of poetry, hot off the press! For only $25, plus GST and $6 shipping in Canada, you'll get:

Little Housewolf by Medrie Purdham

Medrie Purdham's Little Housewolf delves deeply into the world of domestic miniatures, a realm where thimbles, baby teeth, push pins, keyholes, teacups, and wedding rings become meticulously realized scale models of one's terrors and joys. Purdham uses the fine-grained signatures of her poetry—close observation, exact detail, precise sounds—not only to examine childhood and its fascination with size and scale, but also to measure herself against the larger, untamed landscapes she feels increasingly alienated from.

Nectarine by Chad Campbell

Memory—how we retrieve and replenish it—is at the heart of Nectarine, Chad Campbell's visionary second collection. Figures, cities, and landscapes from the author's life shift in and out of these dreamlike poems that explore the "unaccountable, uncountable" ways in which our past keeps speaking to us: through objects, through paintings, through colours, and through the spectre of places that map themselves over the places we live in.
I Am Not Guilty
Frances Shelley Wees

Set in and around post-war Toronto, I Am Not Guilty first appeared in a condensed form in the February 1954 Ladies’ Home Journal.

That same year, it was published in full by Doubleday as M’Lord, I Am Not Guilty. This Ricochet Books edition marks the first new edition since 1967.

Helen Graham has been acquitted in the murder of her wealthy husband, Alberta oil baron Steven Graham, but the eyes of the public continue to view her with suspicion. Worried for her future, and that of her young son, she sets out to find the true killer. The trail leads to the apartment of another woman—and revelations about her dead husband’s secret life—then continues to a growing bedroom community in suburban Toronto. What the widow doesn’t realize is that she is not alone in her pursuit of the murderer or how ready that murderer is to kill again.
Press

On Book of Wings:
"Tawhida Tanya Evanson's first novel is a stunning testament to how the grief of heartbreak can bring us back to who we are." - Sheniz Janmohamed, Quill & Quire "Evanson is a seasoned poet, spoken word performer, and oral storyteller, and her craft is evident in this first work of prose fiction." - Helen Chau Bradley, Montreal Review of Books

On The Family Way:
"The Family Way

On Nectarine:
"Imagine an image hitting the eye with rapid-fire description, as if it were projected through a television that allowed the viewer to delight in the flicker of each frame. This is the technique Campbell favors." –Jim Johnstone, Carousel

On No Grave for This Place:
“This intense collection, which unfolds around loss and decay, finds its most beautiful embodiment in the precision of its gaze.” –Le Devoir

News

JUNE NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch Nectarine by Chad Campbell. Check out our Fall calendar and pre-order Jaspreet Singh's searing memoir My Mother, My Translator!

JUNE NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch Nectarine by Chad Campbell. Check out our and pre-order Jaspreet Singh's searing memoir My Mother, My Translator!

MAY NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, we launch The Montreal Poetry Prize Anthology 2020, Christopher DiRaddo's The Family Way, and Chad Campbell's Nectarine!

APRIL NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month, it's the publication of Christopher DiRaddo's The Family Way! It's also National Poetry Month, so we are offering a Bundle of two new books, Little Housewolf by Medrie Purdham and Nectarine by Chad Campbell! Plus we welcome Carmine Starnino as our new Associate Publisher!MARCH NEWSLETTER (click for link)
This month we are featuring an autobiographical bundle by Kathy Dobson, and get a sneak peek of Medrie Perdham's forthcoming poetry debut Little Housewolf (out in May!)
Discover

Click here to see Kaie Kellough read from his QWF Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Award winning book Dominoes at the Crossroads

Click here to listen to Rosalind Pepall's interview on CBC's All in a Weekend about Talking to a Portrait: Tales of an Art Curator.

In Periodicities’ fifth series of videos, Sadiqa de Meijer reads a few poems from her new book, The Outer Wards. Click here

Read “The Silence of A.M. Klein,” an incisive essay by our editor Carmine Starnino in the April issue of The New Criterion.



SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).