The Mayor of Côte St. Paul
Ronald Cooke

Rum running between Montreal and Windsor in the 40s.


A novel about Montreal during the not-so-halcyon era of a couple of decades ago when gangs and girls made rum-running and slot machines big business.
–from the 1950 edition

Ronald J. Cooke’s second novel, The Mayor of Côte St. Paul is the tale of a struggling writer living in Depression-era Montreal. Winnipegger Dave Manley arrived in the city thinking that its rich atmosphere will inspire his fiction, but was met by a stream rejection slips. His luck turns, for good and bad, when he meets Cherie, a looker from Lunenberg who does dirty work for a crime boss known as The Mayor. It isn’t long before Dave is running booze between Montreal and Windsor, learning all there is to know about the slot machine and liquor rackets.

Dave wants out, Cherie wants out—but there is no easy escape from The Mayor, a man who lives in luxury derived from vice and murder, surrounded by the squalor of Côte St. Paul.

Published in 1950, The Mayor of Côte St. Paul enjoyed the month of June on newsstands, never to be seen again. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty-four years.

Salut King Kong
Elise Moser

New prose from Québec.


Taking its title from a story in the collection, this anthology brings together the best prose writing in Quebec—all short pieces—from the winners and finalists of the last three years of the Quebec Writing Competition.

Montreal’s CBC Radio and the Quebec Writers’ Federation created the competition in 1999 which resulted in four previous anthologies: Telling Stories, Short Stuff, In Other Words, and Minority Reports. The winning stories are broadcast on CBC Radio and published in Maisonneuve magazine.
Blondes Are My Trouble
Douglas Sanderson

"It's been a long time now, nearly two years since we met at that party."
"Yeah," Tessie said bitterly, "and nearly five years since I was a clever little girl who thought she'd found a way to make a hundred dollars. There was only going to be one time. I needed the dough. Two months later I didn't have an excuse any more and I was still doing it. Still am."


A blindingly blonde woman walks into private detective Mike Garfin’s downtown Montreal office, complaining that she’s being followed by a man. That evening, at a luxurious Lakeshore home, he witnesses another woman being forced into a car. Garfin gives chase, only to find her dead and disfigured beneath the wheels of a large truck on Highway 20. At first he sees no connection between the two – why should he? – but Garfin’s pursuit of the truth shows they are inextricably linked by base vice on the highest floors of the swankiest Sherbrooke Street apartments.

This Douglas Sanderson thriller follows Hot Freeze as the second Mike Garfin adventure. First published in 1954 under the title The Darker Traffic, a Dodd, Mead Red Detective Mystery, it was reissued the following year as Blondes are My Trouble by Popular Library. A French translation, Salmigonzeeses (1956), followed as part of Gallimard’s Série noir. This Ricochet Books edition is the first in sixty years.


Advance Praise:

Mike Garfin is a boy who seems to like his work, especially if it includes blondes. –Berkeley Gazette

The story combines fancy floozies, sizzling smooching and gore … Fast paced action with a surprise climax. –Tulsa World
The Scarborough
Michael Lista

The Scarborourgh takes place over three days in 1992: Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday—the weekend 15-year-old Kristin French was abducted and murdered by Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka. In poems both opulent and stricken, ravishing and unflinching, Michael Lista—nine, at the time—revisits those dates, haunted by the horrifying facts he now possesses. Inspired, in part, by Dante’s Inferno, Virgil's tale of Orpheus’ descent into the underworld for Eurydice, as well as the Bernardo trial itself—where the judge ruled that the gallery could hear the video tapes of the crimes, but not see them—Lista’s poems adhere to a single rule: you cannot gaze at the beloved you seek to rescue. The Scarborourgh is book about Bernardo that doesn’t show us Bernardo, a conceptual project that ignores its concept. Shiveringly bold, it is a major achievement.


Praise for Bloom:

"There aren't many Canadian books of poetry that are anticipated with quite so much excitement as Michael Lista's debut, which has been the talk of the town for some time. But the book outpaces the expectations even of those kindly disposed to it.”—Quill and Quire (which named Bloom a Book of the Year)

“Lista has here brought together potent ingredients, at once harmonious and dissonant, in a container with metal enough to withstand blasts from poems being split apart and reincarnated.”—The Globe and Mail

“A brilliant, erudite new voice on the Canadian poetry scene."—Montreal Gazette
Leaving the Island
Talya Rubin

St. Kilda is a barren, rocky archipelago 60 km off the west coast of Scotland. In 1930, harsh conditions led the islands’ remaining 36 inhabitants to relocate to the mainland. Left behind were seabirds and a population of feral sheep. In Leaving the Island, her first poetry collection, Talya Rubin enters the isolated lives of those last Kildareans, and probes the “desert places”—to use Frost’s phrase—in herself. Written during a series of extended trips abroad, including stays in Australia and Greece, Rubin’s poems return, again and again, to a psychological landscape where “mud and rock / and sea and salt and oily smell / of fish and fowl is all, all.” Rife with exacting wordplay and frank self-reckonings, Leaving the Island is a book about endings and what remains when we start over.
Press

On Demonic to Divine:
“Fraught with rage and admiration and bewilderment, a daughter reaches the through the pages of time to heroically attempt to fathom her mother.  Shulamis Yelin, was both a successful writer and a mentally ill mother.  In this fascinating book, her daughter searches for understanding with fluctuating compassion . . . and finds love. –Michele Zackheim, author of Last Train to Paris

On Laws & Locks:
Muscled and big boned as Lowell’s poems on his ancestors, Chad Campbell’s lines hold enough feral energy to carve a small farm out of the great hardwood forest. This work is just and transcendent. A marvelous debut. – Tim Lilburn

On A View From the Porch:
Praise for Avi Friedman: “One of the top 10 style setters who will most influence the way we live in the next quarter century.” –Wallpaper

News

Talya Rubin, reading from her new book, Leaving the Island, won the 2015 Poetry Now Battle of the Bards. Listen to her performance.  http://ifoa.org/podcasts/winner-talya-rubin-reads-at-poetry-now

Guillaume Morissette’s novel New Tab is a finalist for the Amazon.ca First Novel Award. The Awards ceremony is May 21 in Toronto.

Spring 2015
Check out our new catalogue for Spring 2015!

Congratulations to Esplanade author, Guillaume Morissette. His novel New Tab is shortlisted for the 2014 Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction.

Mary Dalton's Hooking is shortlisted for the 2014 East Coast Literary Awards. Congrats Mary! http://goo.gl/Y4AFGd

Discover

Hear George Tombs discuss Canada's Forgotten Slaves on CBC's C'est la vie

Hear Elaine Kalman Naves talk about Portrait of a Scandal on CBC's Cinq à six

Read an excerpt from the latest mystery by Sheila Kindellan-Sheehan, The Courier Wore Shorts.

Meet Margaret H. Atwood. Read an excerpt from Missy Marston's The Love Monster
SODEC, Québec  Canada Council for the Arts Canadian Heritage
The Canada Council
Véhicule Press acknowledges the generous support of its publishing program from the Book Publishing Industry Development Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage, The Canada Council for the Arts, and the Société de développement des entreprises culturelles du Québec (SODEC).